Message for the Disagreeable

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33 thoughts on “Message for the Disagreeable

  1. Hi, I love your blog, I am a scottish girl married to an iranian boy, who lives in iran and this blog has gave me so much inspiration. So thanks for sharing :).
    I was wondering where you find all the pictures and do you ever worry about running out.

    Thanks Alexis

    • Hi Alexis,
      Thanks for your comment. I find them everywhere on the Internet- news sites like GettyImages, cultural sites like Bia2.com, Skyscrapercity.com, and sometimes I just do a Google blog search for “manteau”.
      I still have LOTS more photos and articles to post, so I won’t run out for another year or so. Who knows? Perhaps in that time, this clothing item will become a part of history, or maybe not. In any case, I’ve got lots more pictures coming! 🙂
      Enjoy the blog,
      shorty x

  2. Hi! I have a few questions…I’m going to Tehran to attend a meeting and I’m really confused and worried about what clothes to wear.

    Am i allowed to wear colors or is it restricted to black?
    Is it true i cant show my feet?
    are boots allowed? are jeans allowed?

    • I am not based in Tehran, so I cannot really make comments, but from the pictures and from my general knowledge, I can see with certainty that jeans are allowed. Colors are definitely allowed, though bright ones are still frowned upon by certain groups. Feet can be shown (pants that show off more of the legs are sometimes targeted though). Boots are allowed, but wearing high heel ones is also occasionally targeted by crackdowns. This website has lots of examples of what can be worn: http://www.letsgoiran.com/iran-women-dress-code

  3. Hi, I love the website, too. For the past several days, all I can think about are scarves. Perhaps it has something to do with working on a conceptual fashion show (styles between the 1950s and 1960s). Thanks for the inspiration and keep posting photos!

  4. hi,
    im going to iran in 3-4months, and i would just like to know what are the fashion trends and in iran at the moment
    thank you xx

    • hi Mahsa,

      It is very difficult for me to say, considering I am not located in Iran myself, but judging from the most recent pics, colorful skinny jeans are huge (same as everywhere) and bright colorful manteaus seem to be as well! Please check my 2013 and 2012 category for more photos.

      Thank you for your comment,

      shorty

    • Hi Niloofar,

      Slightly above the knee or mid-thigh length is what I am usually seeing in pics. I have not seen too many REALLY short ones recently, but I also have not seen the really long ones (ankle length) either. Waterfall cardigan-type ones (longer in the front, shorter in the back) were popular last year. Poncho coats are still around too. The coolest trend in the past year is the one of dresses being worn over black opaque tights (not over leggings or pants). That’s a really rebellious style, and I love it.

      Hope this helps,

      shorty

  5. I really enjoy this site, thank you. I am an English woman working in Tehran and I like to be creative with my “uniform”. I have heard you allude to a particular kind of green. I have heard this before but want to know whether there is currently, post-election 2013, likely to be attention to what colour green I wear.

    • Hi Indi,
      Thank you for your comment.
      I think after the 2013 election, it’s been a little quieter. The new president’s color is purple, not green. However, sometimes when his supporters come out on the streets for rallies, a few of them are wearing green and purple ribbons/bracelets/items together, so I am sure green still has a meaning to some people….maybe not as much to the government anymore.
      Glad you like the blog!
      shorty

      • Hello Jessie Marie,
        Take your time to find out how to feel comfortable in your space. You might wish to start modestly, getting used to wearing a scarf, and coats/tunics that cover your bottom. The scarf made me seem quiet/shy to start with which was not a good image for me as a management consultant. I seemed shy because I was feeling somewhat hidden and inhibited, and also worried about the scarf falling off. Pins and clips help while you get used to it. It’s not so warm now but be warned that a pashmina, for example, can be very hot indoors and there’s a lot of fabric in the way of eating dinner. I felt restricted and too hot sitting in restaurants in a coat and scarf, I have some Kuwaiti headscarfs that are extremely easy to wear but more attractive than the standard maghnaeh (hood). After about 6 months I began to feel more like my normal self again and I could express my personality confidently again You will get used to it. I could not get along with buying local ‘uniform’. The cotton manteaus were not very good quality and never fitted well. There seemed to be a gap in the market. It was all too cheap, or too glam, or too frumpy I found it much easier to buy things on ebay in the UK and get them sent.

  6. Ha ha, I wear purple a lot and when I travel I carry a toy black cat in a purple witches hat. The cat has been commented upon in relation to the new president.
    So, I can probably get away with a forest green manteau now
    I also go running in the mornings on the streets. I have rarely seen another woman running so I don’t know what they wear. I wear running leggings, plus a running skirt, with a long oversized long-sleeved running shirt. If I feel a bit too revealed I wear a tennis dress too. I had a few trials with different headscarves but the best, by far is a Buff, worn to cover the neck and head (ninja style).
    Indy (also quite a shorty)

  7. I’m an American married to an iranian boy and am moving to iran in two weeks! This gave me so much inspiration for what to wear! I love your blog so much!

    • Thank you so much for your kind comment, Jessie Marie! I took a look at your blog, and I thought it was very interesting. I got married only 6 months ago, and I wish you and your husband the best of luck in your journey! 🙂

      shorty

  8. it is very interesting that you closely follow Iranian clothing fashion. that was a surprise to me when i found out by your comments that you are not located in Iran. looking at the pictures, had no doubt that the one uploading these pics is definitely living in Tehran. you must have been living in Iran for a while, haven’t you?

    • Believe it or not, I have never lived in Iran or traveled there…I have had some Iranian friends and I have so many photos because I am lucky to use Google Translate to get access to so many sites. 🙂

    • Believe it or not, I have never lived in Iran or traveled there…I have had some Iranian friends and I have so many photos because I am lucky to use Google Translate to get access to so many sites. 🙂

  9. Oh, I love that blog…there are some truly lovely outfits there! The guy that runs it is very strict about the use of his photos though- he actually got some Instagrams deleted because they used his photos and did not properly credit him. I believe I have referred to a few of his photos in some of my own posts previously, but I always credit him when needed.

    • Support Love still exists on Instagram, but they don’t post often…I have seen a couple nice pics on the Instagram site, but I do not have enough time these days to browse their page for so long…maybe later on this year, I will look through their account and see what they got.

  10. Hi love the blog as outfits put together are beautiful! What would you say the closet clothing to manteaus would be as I can’t find them anywhere on the net and there’s so many in Tehran pictured that I love 😞😞!! I’m located in Uk and this blog is like choco to me hahaha 😂

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